NDAGA

Monica Tininenko

  

Artist Bio

My name is Monica Tininenko and I was born and raised in North Dakota. Through my years of traveling this great state I have grown to love the scenery and people. In 2011, I began to photograph the state I love and continue to do so today. The gift of my first DSLR camera in 2011 brought tremendous joy to my heart. I began photographing all the abandoned farms and houses I’d been admiring for decades. Those images came together in my first show titled “Prairie Tales”. That gift also allowed me to take part in a Historic Asylum preservation and documentation project, known as Project Kirkbride. The first Asylum our group of 40 photographers and videographers sought to document was the Fergus Falls Regional Treatment Center in Fergus Falls, MN. The project exposed me to photographers from all over the country and was a great learning experience. On the technical side, I studied 35mm Black and White film photography and development, and digital photography at Minot State University. The rest of my time behind the camera has been largely experimental and incredibly fun. Night photography became a passion only recently. During a trip to London, England in March of 2014 I began to notice just how different cities and buildings became at night. That trip truly inspired this show I call “Night Life”. The exhibit portrays the places we see during the day but might not recognize or take the time to appreciate after the sunsets. Night is something that affects all parts of the world and can also be so beautifully unique to everybody.

Artist Statement

Art is something to everyone. Art is a way for me to relax, to learn, to express, and to concentrate. The process of creating art is as important as the final product. Photography is my most common way of capturing things I feel are important to share and how I express my love of life. The fact that there are so many photographers today can be discouraging to a beginning artist, but that hasn’t stopped me from creating images and sharing them with whoever is willing to look. It can take a great deal of courage to share one’s work with the world, but once you start, it can be hard to stop!